Begin At The Beginning

In trying to become a runner, I’m using The Starting Line as a guide. After a couple of months, I’m still somewhere between steps 1 and 2. And that’s okay.

Whether it’s this plan, one you get from a friend, or one from a personal trainer, it’s important to remember that these are guides. Our bodies are all unique, and it’s up to us to know our true limitations, and not what we either want them to be, or what we convince ourselves that they are.

At the beginning of the year, I’d have told you my limitation was pretty much a trip to the grocery store. By the time I walked all the way around the store and then carried the groceries up to the second floor, I was too exhausted to do anything else for the rest of the day. Or, you know, week. I know now that this was a false limitation. I felt tired, therefore that must be all that I can do. I know now that a little bit more each day beyond what I think I can do is what helps me improve. (For what it’s worth, I’ve improved to the point where I admit that I giggled a little when my husband complained about walking “all the way back” to the other side of the store for something, and offered to go get it for him. Before, I had him fetching things for me all the time.)

I’ve also learned that there are limits, and my body will tell me when I hit them. I know, for example, that if I try to do a mile when I have a severe sinus infection, I will pass out. But my mind says, “Skip the workout completely, you’re too sick.” My body knows that’s a false limitation. I can’t do a mile, but I can do a half mile, or lift, or cycle so that I’m already sitting down if I get dizzy. I can work out at home so that if I do feel faint, I can stop and rest without being in anyone’s way (except the cats, but I’m always in their way).

One of the cats, looking reproachfully at me because I'm in his way.

Cheese looking at me reproachfully because I’m in his way.

One of my favorite quotes is from Richard Bach’s Illusions:

Argue for your limitations, and sure enough, they’re yours.

There are enough other people arguing for your limitations already, enough people telling you that you can’t or you’re not good enough or you won’t make it. There are enough other people telling you that you’re not doing enough, that you need to push yourself harder. You can ignore all of that. It’s harder to ignore it when you’re saying it to yourself. Just remind yourself that your limitations are exactly that: YOURS. Only you know what you’re truly capable of, and only you can decide what you’re going to be capable of  a month from now, or a year from now, or five years from now. And if your pace is a little slower than some, so what? It’s your pace, and at least you’re going somewhere.

Anticipation

Sunday was the Zombie Run. Monday, I worked out at home. Tuesday and Thursday I was at the gym, and last night I did laps after work.

For someone who’s been slacking a bit, four workouts in a week is a lot. I plan to get more in this week.

 

I also have an appointment with my doctor on Wednesday.

 

doctor-scale-by-enthalpyy

 

I’m sure these two things are totally unrelated. Nothing at all to do with the fact that I weighed in at 219 last time I was there. I mean, what? Trying to drop a couple of extra pounds before my “official” weigh-in? Nah. (Though, if it matches what my scale says at home, I’m totally taking a picture.)

The Importance of Proper Footwear, Part 2

“Why, Kitty!” I hear you say. “Are those the Asics Kayano 19 I see on your feet?”

1003128_10151723882303767_650064919_n

Yes. Yes, they are. They are like wrapping your feet in marshmallows and walking on tiny feather pillows.

I took them for a test run today. Well, test walk. I was able to walk at double my usual pace, and maintain it longer, with minimal pain. Unfortunately, still not one of my better workouts since I ate too soon before I went to the gym and ended up with some nasty pains in my side. But I was able to “walk” at a near jogging speed. I’m on my way to running.